Essay Framers

Framers Of The U.S. Constitution

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Framers of the U.S. Constitution

On July 4, 1776 the Declaration of Independence was signed. The thirteen colonies were no longer under King George III rule. It was a new world that needed a new type of leadership. On July 12, 1776 the Second Congress proposed the Articles of Confederation. The articles were ratified by all thirteen states on March 1, 1781.
Under the Articles of Confederation each state had its own sovereignty. And the central government was to provide thing such as national security, treaties, courts, and currency. However the government could not tax. If the states didn't pay their bills to the government there was nothing the government could do about it. This is just one of many reasons why the Articles didn't work. In 1786 Virginia tried to get the Articles modified by holding a meeting known as the Annapolis Conference. This meeting failed because only five states sent delegates. A few months later another meeting was held in Philadelphia.
The meeting in Philadelphia was successful, it is known as the Constitutional Conventional. James Madison went to the meeting in Philadelphia it was his idea to create the United States in a republican model. The people would have the power in the form of representatives. Madison and his fellow Virginians came up with the details and a plan for the new government, it was known as the Virginia Plan. And Madison became known as the father of the constitution.
After Hamilton presented his plan to the convention, many other plans and compromises were written. The Great Compromise, Patterson and the New Jersey Plan, Hamilton and The British Plan, and the North-South Compromise.
The framers had four major goals for the constitution. They wanted to create a strong government that would be able to meet the need's of the nation. Yet they wanted to keep the existence of the separate states. They also didn't want to threaten liberty. And lastly they wanted to create a government that everyone could agree upon.
All of the framer of the U.S. Constitution had one thing in common, they all felt that the government didn't have enough power. At the same time they didn't want to give the government to much power. They all knew if there was power to be held someone was going to hold it and over use it The framers didn't want to create a system like Britain or England.

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To keep this from happening the framers created limits on the government through checks and balances (separated institutions sharing powers), grants and denials, Bill of Rights, federalism, judicial review, and elections.
Although all of the plans and compromises were written with different views they did share one common thought. That the government should be separated into different categories or departments. The government was divided into three branches the executive, legislative, and judicial. Even though the power was divided the framers were still uneasy that one would have or over use their power. To keep such a thing from happening the framers designed the system of checks and balances, it has also been known as the separated intuitions sharing power.
Each of the three branches overlaps each other in power. Each branch checks each others power. For example to have something passed, such as a bill, it has to be approved by the majority in each house. Their powers overlap in other ways too. Such as congress has power over presidency and vise versa. This means congress can impeach the president and remove him from office. Another system of checks is the president can veto acts of congress, but in return if congress finds this unfair they can choose to override this veto. Other checks are the congress over supreme court, supreme court over congress, president over supreme court, and supreme court over the president.
The framers were very concerned with protecting liberty, it was one of their major goals for the constitution. They came up with the grants and denials of power. These powers imply that "authority not granted to the government by the constitution was in theory denied to it" (54). The denials of power was greatly used in the constitution to really limit the government. The framers didn't want to treat their people like the European and French did, they used the denials of power to prohibit a lot of things other countries did, that they didn't want to do. Such as a person can not be imprisoned with out a charge.
The framers didn't want people who would later come into government to be able to give themselves more power. Under the denial of powers a proposed amendment would only become a law if three fourths of state conventions or state legislators ratified it.
Another way the framers limited government was through the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was added to the constitution because the framers feared that the doctrine of expressed powers didn't state all of the peoples rights. The framers felt if the rights weren't written down the government would ignore it. The Bill of Rights became the first ten amendments of the Constitution. The Bill of Rights gives every person basic civil liberties such as freedom of speech, religion, bearing arms, protection against unreasonable search and seizures, double jeopardy, speedy and public trial, and unreasonable bail. Even though the framers wanted to give every person their rights they had to put limits on them in order to protect everyone.
The freedom of speech and press comes with responsibilities. Libel and slander, this means false allegations that are published or spoken can be grounds for a lawsuit. Meaning one person can not threaten another persons life and get away with it because of the first amendment. Other examples of things that you are not free to say are obscenity and anything that incites to imminent lawless violence.
The framers had many goals for the constitution. One of their most important goals was protecting liberty by limiting the government. They were able to protect people's liberty in many ways through the constitution. The Bill of Rights and grants and denials are just a few examples. The framers learn through mistakes of other countries as well as mistakes through the Articles of Confederation.

Work Cited

Patterson, Thomas E. We The People: A Concise Introduction to American Politics. 6th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2006



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The United States is a country that ever since it was found represented freedom for so many people. Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence and promised everyone life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The framers of the constitution wanted to create a strong Union where people were free, there was equality and most importantly there was order in this new Union that was being created. In this paper I will cover how the framers achieved those goals by using Federalist number 10, 51, 78, 15 and 39. The framers used a system of checks and balances in order to control all branches of the government to keep chaos from occurring. The framers also divided the government into different branches so the government…show more content…

In federalist 10 Madison gives a perfect example of trying to balance and establish: liberty, equality and order by saying that no man can serve as a judge in his own trial. The framers realize that most people think about themselves first before thinking of the greater good. Not being able to serve as a judge in your own trial represents liberty because you are allowed to have a trial, it also represents equality for the same reason. As well as introduces the concept that you are innocent till proven guilty, that you can defend yourself. However it also represents order because the government isn’t going to let someone who is at fault or could benefit from a certain verdict to make decisions about his or her own mistakes. And that a person might overlook what they have done regardless of what the right thing to do is. “No man is allowed to be a judge in his own cause; because his interests would certainly bias his judgment, and, not improbably, corrupt his integrity” (Madison 464). The framers of the constitution knew that human nature was not perfect and they knew that people could be greedy therefore they knew that the government might get greedy as well. In the sense that the people who are in charge might not always want to do what's best for the people. To want their friends and family to be in charge and run the country in ways that benefited them instead of the people who they are representing. The

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