Cs 71 Solved Assignment 2013 Corvette

Heterobranchia

  • Order Nudibranchia Cuvier, 1817

  • Superfamily Aeolidioidea Gray, 1827

  • Family Facelinidae Bergh, 1889

  • Genus PhidianaGray, 1850

Type speciesEolidia patagonica d’Orbigny, 1836, by subsequent designation by Alder & Hancock (1855).

Phidiana lottini (Lesson, 1831) (Fig. 1A)

Eolidia lottiniLesson, 1831: 290, pl. 14, fig. 6. Cavolina lottini d’Orbigny, 1837: 194. Phidiana incaGray, 1850: 108; Bergh, 1867: 100, pl. 3, figs. 1–13; Marcus, 1959: 79, figs. 184–190; Álamo & Valdivieso, 1997: 85. Phidiana lottiniSchrödl, 1996a: 41, pl. II, fig. 13. pl. VII, fig. 41; Schrödl, 2003: 83, figs. 51, 63, 64, 88; Schrödl, 2009: 539; Schrödl et al., 2005: 7, pl. 2, fig. 17; Uribe et al., 2013: 52, fig. 3J; Schrödl & Hooker, 2014: 54, figs. 12, 13; Uribe et al., 2014: 167. A detailed chresonymy can be found in Schrödl (2003).

Material examined: Two specimens collected in a tidal pool in rocky outcrops, Playa Brava (27°03′S; 70°49′W), Caldera, Región de Atacama, Chile (MZUC 39608); and one specimen collected inside an empty Austromegabalanus psittacus shell in Calderilla (27°05′S; 70°50′W), Caldera, Región de Atacama, Chile (MPCCL 90216A).

Diagnosis: Elongate body of silky white to sometimes reddish color, covered by 20–26 parallel rows of conspicuously colored cerata. Dorsum with a fine longitudinal white line. Cerata with bands of brown and orange at base and with bright whitish tips. Rhinophores annulate, yellowish white. Oral tentacles long and pinkish-white. Anterior foot corners slightly extended.

Distribution:Phidiana lottini has been recorded in Chile from Punta Blanca, Arica (18°29′S; 70°20′W) to the Guaitecas Islands (44 °S), southern Chile (Schrödl, 2003; Schrödl & Hooker, 2014). This species has also been recorded from Ancash, Isla Santa, Lima, and Callao (12°02′S), central Peru (Uribe et al., 2013; Schrödl & Hooker, 2014).

Remarks:Phidiana lottini is easily recognizable from other aeolid sea slugs found in northern Chile because of the cerata arranged in parallel rows and the presence of a white dorsal line between the rhinophores. This is a comparatively common nudibranch in the area, usually found in protected localities. Egg masses of this species are loosely coiled whitish spiral ribbons, of about 30 mm in diameter (see Schrödl, 2003).

Superfamily Doridoidea

  • Family Chromodorididae Bergh, 1891

  • Genus TyrinnaBergh, 1898

Type speciesTyrinna nobilisBergh, 1898 (= Tyrinna delicata (Abraham, 1877)), by monotypy.

Tyrinna delicata (Abraham, 1877) (Fig. 1B)

Doris delicataAbraham, 1877: 211, pl. XXX, figs. 20–22. Tyrinna nobilisBergh, 1898: 523, pl. 30, figs. 21–29, pl. 32, figs. 21–24; Marcus, 1959: 31, figs. 45–53; Muniaín, Valdés & Ortea, 1996: 265, figs. 2–6; Schrödl, 1996a: 22, pl. 3, fig. 15; Schrödl, 1997: 41; Schrödl, 2003: 31, figs. 15, 70; Schrödl et al., 2005: 4, pl. 1, fig. 8; Schrödl & Millen, 2001: 1146, figs. 1–6; Schrödl, 2009: 521; Aldea, Césped & Rosenfeld, 2011: 43, fig. 3C. Uribe et al., 2013: 48, fig. 2A. Tyrinna pusaeMarcus, 1959: 33, figs. 54–64. A detailed chresonymy can be found in Schrödl (2003).

Material examined: One specimen collected under rocks at low tide, in tidal pools in rocky outcrops, South of Obispito (26°45′51″S; 70°45′07″W), Caldera, Región de Atacama, Chile (MPCCL 90216B).

Diagnosis: Body oval-elongate, translucent-whitish, with opaque white lines surrounding the edges of foot and mantle. Dorsum smooth, with irregular and submarginal rows of orange spots, absent from the central region of mantle. Oral tentacles longitudinally enrolled. Anterior part of foot bilabiate, forming a thick lip. Posterior end of the foot extending beyond the mantle in crawling individuals (see Uribe et al. (2013) for a more complete description).

Distribution: From Isla Blanca (09 °S), Ancash, Peru to Peninsula Valdés, in the Atlantic Magellan Strait (Schrödl & Millen, 2001; Uribe et al., 2013). This species has been also recorded in the Juan Fernández Islands, off central Chile.

Remarks:Tyrinna delicata is clearly distinguishable from other nudibranchs in northern Chile by the submarginal dorsal rows of orange spots, which are very visible in the translucent whitish mantle. This species, having a complex synonymy, was listed as Tyrinna nobilis until recent, however the discovery of the holotype of Tyrinna delicata (Abraham, 1877) by Schrödl & Millen (2001) gave priority to the latter name.

  • Family Discodorididae Bergh, 1891

  • Genus Baptodoris Bergh, 1884

Type speciesBaptodoris cinnabarina Bergh, 1884, by monotypy.

Baptodoris peruviana (d’Orbigny, 1837) (Fig. 1C)

Doris peruviana d’Orbigny, 1837: 188, pl. XV, figs. 7–9. Doriopsis peruvianaDall, 1909: 203. Platydoris punctatellaBergh, 1898: 521, figs. 12–20; Dall, 1909: 203; Schrödl, 1996a: 23, pl. IV, fig. 27. Dendrodoris peruvianaÁlamo & Valdivieso, 1997: 85. Platydoris peruvianaSchrödl, 2003: 34, figs. 17, 54, 71. Baptodoris peruvianaFischer & Cervera, 2005a: 515, figs. 1–8. Uribe et al., 2013: 51, fig. 3D. Baptodoris? peruvianaSchrödl & Hooker, 2014: 48, fig. 4.

Material examined: One specimen collected under rocks at very low tide, Playa Ramada (27°00′S; 70°48′W) Caldera, Región de Atacama, Chile (MZUC 39607).

Diagnosis: Elevated, oval and slightly convex white-yellowish body, with minute brown spots over the notum which is densely covered by very small rounded caryophyllidia. Rhinophores and gills hyaline white, not elevated. Rhinophores are perfoliate with 7–10 lamellae. The branchial tuft consists of 6 uni-bipinnate gills, which form a circle around the anus at the posterior end of the body. Ventrally, the head is small with short digitiform oral tentacles. The foot is narrow, with the anterior edge notched at the mid-line and grooved. The notal margin is white and wider than the foot (see Fischer & Cervera (2005a) for a complete description).

Distribution: According to Fischer & Cervera (2005a), this species has been recorded from South of San Lorenzo Island, Lima, Peru to Valparaiso, (33°02′S; 71°38′W) Chile.

  • Genus Diaulula Bergh, 1884

  • Type speciesDoris sandiegensis (Cooper, 1863), by monotypy.

Diaulula variolata (d’Orbigny, 1837) (Fig. 1D)

Doris variolata d’Orbigny, 1837: 186, pl. 16, figs. 1–3. Anisodoris marmorataMarcus, 1959: 45, figs. 98–103; Schrödl, 2003: 41, figs. 21, 57, 75; Fischer & Cervera, 2005b: 174. Uribe et al., 2013: 48, fig. 2B. Anisodoris marmorataBergh, 1898: 515, pl. 30, figs. 5–7 (non Archidoris marmorata Bergh, 1881); Marcus, 1959: 45, figs. 98–103. Anisodoris rudberghiMarcus & Marcus, 1967: 69; Schrödl, 1996a: 25, pl. IV, figs. 21–22; Schrödl, 1996b. Peltodoris marmorataValdés & Muniaín, 2002: 349, figs. 1D, 4, 5. A detailed chresonymy can be found in Schrödl (2003: 39).

Material examined: One specimen collected under rocks at very low tide, North of Obispito (26°45′S; 70°45′W), 40 km N of Caldera, Región de Atacama, Chile (MZUC 39606).

Diagnosis: Whitish-yellowish body with minute black spots over the notum, which is densely covered by small and narrow caryophyllidia. Wide free mantle rim. Rhinophoral and branchial sheaths elevated, covered with caryophyllidia. Six to seven gills, ramified up to four-five times. Oral tentacles long and digitiform. Foot bilabiate, with upper lip notched. Lip cuticle smooth. Rhinophores have more than 15 lamellae (see Schrödl (2003) for a complete description).

Distribution: This species has been recorded in Chile from Arica (18 °S) to the Bahía de San Vicente (36 °S), and most recently from Ica, Perú (Uribe et al., 2013).

  • Family Dorididae Rafinesque, 1815

  • Genus Doris Linnaeus, 1758

Type speciesDoris verrucosa Linnaeus, 1758, by monotypy.

Doris fontainii d’Orbigny, 1837 (Fig. 2A)

Doris fontainii d’Orbigny, 1837: 189, pl. 15, figs. 1–3. Anisodoris fontainiOdhner, 1926: 85, figs. 70–72, pl. 3, figs. 47–49; Schrödl, 1996a: 24, pl. III, fig. 19; Schrödl, 2000b: 73, fig. 2–3. Doris fontaineiGay, 1854: 76; Valdés & Muniaín, 2002: 346, figs. 1A–B, 2A–C, 3A–B; Uribe et al., 2013: 51, fig. 3E; Schrödl & Hooker, 2014: 47, fig. 2. Archidoris fontainiSchrödl, 2003: 45, figs. 24, 58, 76; Schrödl, 2009; Schrödl et al., 2005: 4, pl. 2, fig. 9;

CONTENTS COVERED

Chapter- 1 ‘C’ Concepts & Programming involving Pointers, Functions & Files
Chapter- 2 Data Structure
Chapter- 3 Trees & files organization
Chapter- 4 Graphs
Chapter- 5 Searching & sorting
QUESTION PAPERS
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No of Pages: 370
Author : Dinesh Verma, S. Roy
ISBN : 81-89086-27-8.

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